• Gio. Mag 23rd, 2024

AI SPEEDS UP DRUG DESIGN FOR PARKINSON’S BY TEN-FOLD

Researchers have used artificial intelligence techniques to massively accelerate the search for Parkinson’s disease treatments.

The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, designed and used an AI-based strategy to identify compounds that block the clumping, or aggregation, of alpha-synuclein, the protein that characterises Parkinson’s. The team used machine learning techniques to quickly screen a chemical library containing millions of entries, and identified five highly potent compounds for further investigation.

Parkinson’s affects more than six million people worldwide, with that number projected to triple by 2040. No disease-modifying treatments for the condition are currently available

IS SEX SUFFICIENT EXERCISE TO LOOK AFTER YOUR HEART? 

 The hottest science in the prevention of heart disease awaits at ESC Preventive Cardiology 2024, a scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

The annual congress of the European Association of Preventive Cardiology (EAPC), a branch of the ESC, takes place 25 to 27 April at the Megaron – Athens International Conference Centre.

Patients often have insecurities after a heart event and we will discuss important questions such as when sexual activity can be resumed after a heart attack. We know that exercise helps prevent cardiovascular disease, so is sexual activity enough ‘exercise’?. After a heart attack, patients are often scared and depressed. Depression and anxiety can also impact heart health. Additionally, awareness and cognition of one’s heart health play a large role in adhering to a healthy lifestyle. There is also crosstalk between the heart and other organs. That’s why this year’s congress theme is ‘Cardiovascular risk: The heart and beyond’ – exploring how we can harness these interactions to improve heart health and overall wellbeing.

NO LINK BETWEEN COVID-19 VIRUS AND DEVELOPMENT OF ASTHMA IN CHILDREN

In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, many families worried about the long-term effects posed by the SARS-COV-2 virus. Now, researchers from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) found that a SARS-COV-2 infection likely does not increase the risk of asthma development in pediatric patients. The findings were published in the journal Pediatrics.

Respiratory viral infections early in life are risk factors for asthma. Since the SARS-COV-2 virus can cause severe lung inflammation and prolonged respiratory symptoms in certain patients, many families were concerned whether COVID-19 might trigger an asthma diagnosis in their children. CHOP established a team to further evaluate these concerns.

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